grief COVID

Grief is a typical human experience, but the COVID-19 pandemic has upended many of the ways we usually manage the loss. Here are my tips on coping healthily with your grief. 

Grief is one of those emotions that many of us think of only during the loss of a loved one. And while this is the grief, many of us experience grief, and the grieving process, can happen whenever we have a loss. 

During COVID-19, we have experienced many deaths, and those events elicit feelings of grief, but almost everyone has experienced loss due to the coronavirus. We have lost employment, lost freedom of movement lost ability to meet with family and friends as we used to, and lost a sense of control over our lives. All of these are losses that can lead us to feel grief. 

The Mayo Clinic reports that "In addition to feeling grief over the loss of life caused by COVID-19, you're likely grieving the loss of your normal routine." Check out my article on this topic written a couple of months ago by clicking here

"Not only are people now grappling with the loss of normalcy, but also with anticipatory grief, or the feeling that greater loss is yet to come." (Very Well Mind) Some of the grief we feel comes from feeling that we are not in control and worry about future changes. Focusing on the unknown of the future causes stress and anxiety, increasing the grief felt due to our losses. 

Grief affects everyone differently, and for some, grief can be expressed through depression and anger. If you or a loved one appears to be depressed or is becoming "short-fused" or angry, the root issue may be stress created by underlying grief of a loss of normalcy. 

If you or someone you know is experiencing grief, try these steps for coping with your grief. They work for me. 

Using mindfulness, pay attention to your emotions. Keeping your thoughts and feelings in the present moment, experiencing your current feelings, will help guide you to understand those feelings you wish to change. Then you can take control of changing those feelings. 

Stay connected to people. Even though many of us are social distancing and not gathering in groups, don't isolate. Meetings with individuals while physically distancing allows you to stay in touch, as does technology. 

Practice self-care. Do actions that are positive and healthy for you. Eat well, pick up hobbies, rest, and be kind to yourself. 

Feeling well takes time. Changes in your emotional outlook take time, so have patience with yourself. You will feel better in hindsight, but while going through the emotion, it feels like forever. Remind yourself to let the process take its course. 

Validate your feelings. Feelings are simply our response to a situation. Feelings are neither right nor wrong. So, how you're feeling is valid. If you wish to change your feelings, fine, work on that, but don't judge your feelings or use phrases like "I shouldn't feel this way."

Grief from COVID-19 is not your fault. Your losses are yours, as are your feelings. You have control over your response to what has happened to you. You are empowered to cope with your grief, healthily. 

If you're ready to explore life coaching, we would be honored to help. You can read more here about our life coaching practice or call the office directly at 301-850-2177. 

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